second-year undergraduate

Practical Classroom Implementations for Critical Pedagogy

Once one knows about Critical Pedagogy (with respect to Critical Thinking, as was covered in the previous blog), how is that knowledge used? Can strategies be implemented that embrace Critical Pedagogy while not sacrificing content coverage? What are some ways to build criticality in students while maintaining expected requirements for classroom rigor?

Chemical Tests on Coins

Simple chemical tests are described that can indicate the presence of certain metals in coins. A wide variety of chemical concepts are involved. The experiments described are a natural fit for the 2019 National Chemistry Week theme of "Marvelous Metals!"

Critical Thinking vs. Critical Pedagogy

I recently participated in a conference known as the Digital Pedagogy Lab as a fellow, which required leading a workshop (or an equivalent). I chose to structure my workshop around the ideas of critical pedagogy and STEM, and particularly how we use these ideas in a practical way in the classroom (both F2F (face-to-face) and DL (distance learning)). This blog will be one of a two-part series on these topics.

Giving the Syllabus a Lecture

What value does spending time explaining our syllabus in class provide? How much time should we invest in going over the syllabus with our students? Thoughts on talking about the syllabus during the first class meeting.

Beginning and Becoming: Introduction and Invitation

Hi everyone! My name is Clarissa Sorensen-Unruh, and I am a new Lead Contributor/Blogger for the Two-Year College component of ChemEd Xchange. I am beyond thrilled, though, to join ChemEd Xchange and learn more about your interests on this platform. I am hoping you, as the audience, will help guide the topics I write about so that we can focus our discussions to interests both you and I share.

The Periodic Table- Economic Elixir and Agent of Destruction

The history of the world is joined at the hip to the elements comprising the periodic table. The rise and fall of geopolitical empires, the quest to colonize new lands, the ballerina of regional and global diplomacy, the relentless exploitation of the natural landscape, and the driving force of world commerce past, present, and future- and not to mention what's in your refrigerator, pantry, on your person, and in your garbage can- all have the same starting point- the periodic table.