Education

Teaching Chemistry Embedded in History: Reflections on C. K. Ingold's Influence as Historian and Educator

The Bulletin for the History of Chemistry is the official publication of the American Chemical Society's Division for the History of Chemistry. The most recent issue is dedicated to the contributions of C. K. Ingold, one of the founders of physical organic chemistry. It records the proceedings of a symposium at the ACS meeting in Chicago in 1993.

The Myth of Scientific Literacy

If you are among the many high school and college chemistry teachers who have adopted the American Chemical Society's curricula, Chemistry in Context for college students or Chemistry in the Community (ChemCom) in secondary school, you will find that Morris Shamos will challenge the very basis of what you are trying to do, as well as the whole idea of "scientific literacy".

Rethinking Science as a Career

This book is published and distributed as part of the Research Corporation series "of occasional papers on neglected problems in science education". Should we be encouraging our students to prepare for careers in science? If so, what prospects for employment await them, and how ought we best to prepare them?

The Water is Wide

This book was first published in 1972, and is still in print, in paper. The author also wrote "The Great Santini", "The Lords of Discipline", and "The Prince of Tides". His current best-seller is "Beach Music". "The River is Wide" is a fictionalized version of Conroy's own experiences as a teacher of isolated and neglected rural black children in South Carolina.

Schoolgirls

The subtitle for journalist Peggy Orenstein's book is, "Young Women, Self-Esteem, and the Confidence Gap". It was produced in cooperation with the American Association of University Women in an attempt to put human faces on the results of an AAUW research project that provided evidence that girls tend to lose self-confidence at about junior high school age. Ms.